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. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles in north. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by health insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> natural disasters. >> like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> political fumbles. >> 5 seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> all right, as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the freight -- the reelection of barack obama. as "ti" magine plus a cover story states, barack obama will be the first democrat in more than 75 years to win a majority of the popular vote twice. mitt romney has to be asking himself, giving the magnitude of the president's problems and the great numbers of americans who believe the country was headed in the wrong direction, "how did i lose?" as the republican national convention, a vermont couple to
-tech multimillion dollar back room operation to identify every obama vote and then turn it out on election day? for finally, was the smartest obama decision just bring it in, bubba? >> no president, not me, not any of my predecessors, no one could have fully repaired all the damage that he found in just four years. chris: was that stacking the deck, mike? >> all good. the one they think wargs the brilliant one was betting that if they spent $150 million in nine or 10 states over the summer, it would pay dividends when the thing got tough. and they bet it when they didn't know they would have money later. chris: to bring down romney. >> as a rich plutocrat. they knew that would help them later if it got tight and it did get tight. obama told people in the summer what are you doing? what are you thinking? i want to keep it close now and win it in the debates. that's pretty much more or less how it turned out. >> except that first debate. chris: katty. >> the fact they managed to find voters where the romney campaign didn't even know voters were. this was an election republicans could have won. b
bring? he gave as you preview of what is to come in march. >> after the election i will have more flex ability. >> yikes. more flexibility? my goodness this president has exercised more flexibility than a yoga master so far in his first four years. i can't wait to imagine what even more flexibility might look like. i mean, we have twisted the constitution a hundred different ways. we have had executive orders in assisted of legislation. we somehow believe that we will have a strong economy if we continue to punish people who produce and somehow reward people who don't. and we have also had a foreign policy that is supposed to make a stronger and more respected, but it hasn't worked out either. let's just put it this way. if that is flexibility, we all better learn to be very flexible the next four years. earlier this month susan rice withdrew her name from consideration from post of secretary of state. that's after strong opposition to her potential nomination. republicans were critical of her after she went on five different sunday news shows. she gave this explanation for the terrori
better way to have spent our first year together here than surviving the ups and downs of election 2012. as i look back, i hope we have been able to give you the kind of thoughtful, sober minded take on presidential elections that our sacred democratic process deserves. after all, choosing our nation's leader is serious business. let me tell you, keeping a straight face throughout the year of absolute absurdity in this political condition has not been easy. come on, rick santorum was a serious contender for the nomination. that happened. and newt gingrich won the south carolina primary. for us political geeks here, the fact that newt gingrich was the jesse jackson of 2012 is complete hilarity. you have to laugh to keep from crying at the biggest punch line of all. after two years of campaigning, a record $2 billion in election spending, the angst, anxiety, where did he end up? where we started. president barack obama in the white house and a house of representatives. we can't hold it in any longer. our very last show of the year is something of an experiment. our first ever annual look
? >> well, sadly mitt romney not only because he lost the election, because he went out with the same kind of comment that got him in trouble in the first place talking about giving people obama winning over voters because he gave them gifts kind of hurt the party on his way out. >> clarence? >> you beat me to the tea party but the old saying goes populous movements are like bees they sting and then they die. i think the sting of the tea party is over. >> that's a good axiom. is it yours? >> i'll take it. >> is it in the glossary? >> i'll go look it up. >> okay. i like it. destined for political oblivion in 2013. vice president join. -- joe biden. even if he runs in 2016 for the presidency. >> named the head of the whole gun thing. >> i'm telling you -- this position. >> we'll have to wait. >> his political style is seen unfortunately for him as too aseckic for broad appeal. maybe you should talk to his wife about running for president. his wife is terrific. >> he may or may not run for president, john. but a lot of people love joe biden. he's an authentic voice and democrats in particular
is on right now. >> we can now definitively say that president barack obama will be re-elected, mitt romney will come up a loser in this race. >> jon: the billing media story of the year, the presidential election. that was how it ended. barack obama beating mitt romney and an end to a bitter season that started early with the g.o.p. primaries and events like this. >> we saw some of this black church in south carolina where a woman asked you why you referred a president obama as the food stamp president. it sounds as if you are suitcase to go belittle people. >> first of all, juan, the fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by barack obama than any president in american history. [ cheers and applause ] >> i know among the political kli correct and i'm supposed to you use facts that are uncomfortable. [ laughter ] >> so that was just part of a long and memorable primary season. juan, is that your highlight of the year. [ laughter ] >> my highlight? it is telling again for newt gingrich. he in a subsequent debate when we was asked about extramarital life and enough about these
for an election in september. >> we have kept our promise. through our leadership, germany has emerged stronger. >> she repeated her tough stance on bailouts and the need for budgetary tightening that made her so popular in germany, but her problem is even coming first in the elections will not be enough. >> she has a very unstable coalition. she needs the coalition right now. she is considered to be a favorite coalition partner. >> at this time, the arithmetic suggests that her new coalition partner after the vote will be her biggest political opponent. this would likely signal a shift away from their hardline austerity in europe. at least at the 2013 predictions are borne out. she may have steered a steady course in the euro zone, a sovereign debt, and banking crisis, but the journey is far from over. >> problems will come again from the financial crisis. we do not know what state of emergency will pop up in the next year. the global economy. >> 2013 they also be the year when germany starts to feel what much of the world has suffered through, the pain of a
of such ideas. now, there's plenty of precedent here. when newt was first elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican party today, was in the wilderness. the jimmy carter occupied the white house, and both the house and senate were safely in democratic hands. but with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took both the house and the senate. but in the house, where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. now, i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman's office who was only steps away from newt, and i can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had not held the majority there since 1954, and it was not a soul alive who could ever imagine a republican majority again. oh, except for newt. with no seniority but a tireless work ethic, a vision and a mind filled with ideas, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devise a strategy over several years to make the republican party a party of ideas once again. it was newt edifies the famous contr
and officials and the plitscle institutions to do the job they were elected to do. we've got some significant issues facing this country and they're all going to come to the forefront next year and if we can, as you say, resolve this issue at this moment in time, how can we come to grips, you know, with tax reform and entitlement reform and debt ceiling, a budget we haven't passed in three years, another budget that expires in march of next year? so these are overwhelming issues and, of course, the world community looks at the united states and says, why can't the united states of america and its elected officials come together to address the big issues of our time? >> senator, you know, a lot of the commentary and some books have been written say, this is on the republican party here. basically the republican party in the house, but many, many people blame republicans for this, for being intransigent on your side about judgeships, about any number of things. do you think your party has erred on the side of partisanship and turned its back in some cases on the country? >> i think that's certa
opposed to any tax increase and senator mccobb nell is up for re-election in 2014 where tea party rebellion toppled his own protÉge and instead, send rand paul to the senate. i'll bring in nbc news capitol hill correspondent, kelly o'donnell. >>> waiting for action here today. >> reporter: it seems pretty quiet at the moment, steve. it's one of those things where you feel like something big is going to happen but as you walk through the corridors here, it seems pretty quiet at the moment. >> well, we have all sorts of conflicting reports out there about what the broad framework would be if there's going to be a deal. i guess the big stumble bling block is number one, what is the fresh hold be for the tax income? $250,000 which obama originally proposed? $400,000 which he supposedly offered in a revised offer a week ago? and then, of course, the status of the sequester. we have $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years, half from defense and half from nondefense discretionary spending. is there any indication if there's a deal today what they're talking about in terms of those two issu
security as well. i want republicans to realize that they were elected to do the will of the people. not just the three% or whatever. they all need to understand that we are all affected by their thinking -- the president won the election, right? host: thank you for the call. i want to take you through some of the effects, if we do go off the fiscal cliff, if congress takes no action. this is the chart from the new york times of what will happen immediately and in the next couple months. in terms of the immediate tax increases, the payroll tax rise of 62% from four 0.2% and workers first $113,000 of income. capital gains, qualified dividend's, and estate and gift taxes are subject to higher taxes. higher earners face new taxes under the health care law. within the next couple glock -- a couple of months, the bush era tax cuts that have been debated over -- the bush-era tax cuts on income expire december 31, workers will not fill the impact until the treasury releases new withholding instructions. alternative minimum tax -- the charred talks about spending cuts, immediate and in the
through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind-boggling to them. >> you know, the president seemed to be much more comfortable in the white house briefing room today using the bully pulpit saying enough is enough. >> he did. i thought he sounded like a man he know s who holds if not all the cards a lot of them. the public tends to blame republicans when this happens, especially now at a time when overall on the house side you have so many republicans who are so far right and worried about somebody farther right running against them in primaries that john boehner is having a hard time getting them to agree to his packages like plan b last week. we don't know out here on the public how much has changed since last week, but president obama was saying something he was planning to say. >> joy, is this the same thing? >> one thing you notice the president didn't doll is off any new plan. he's laying this debacle squarely at the feet of the congress. the president helped himself by previously making some offer that even his base was u
to indiana, ran for state legislature, you were elected. what were some of the experiences as someone in the 1990's. -- 1990's? what were some of the experiences that informed the way you conducted yourself as state legislature? >> let me talk about the part of congress when i served in washington. i served in macintosh's committee that dealt with small business. we did a hearing with allied signal in southern indiana. and dennis kucinich and tom romer -- tim romer, both came to this committee to try to get something done there. it was not all cotton candy and rainbows. people at least were working together to try to reach a reasonable conclusion. here in indiana, as a state legislator, i have seen governor daniels be a get-it-done governor. i remember the first meeting with governor daniels came to our caucus. i had been in the general assembly for two years. some of the members were saying, bir going to balance the budget here in two years or four years. governor daniels walk in the room and said we would balance it in one year. that was the most important leadership decision of his
of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy for securing a romney victory would come to grief so kind of spectacularly. i mean, i'm telling you. even the communities who came out to vote, i think, were shocked by their own numbers and by their own power. i mean, when you look at the cuban community in florida, a community that has historically voted super conservative and suddenly see an entirely new generation voting, and you see those numbers that they put up for obama. it was extraordinary. and i think that a lot of folks have very poor sense of what's happening in this country on the gro
his second term. he was elected to lead. we can still avoid going over the fiscal cliff if we step for this week and republicans to solve this problem and solve it now. >> we talk with washington post reporter laurie montgomery this morning for the update on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tell us, what kind of a deal the president offered and what is new in the negotiations among the senators and between the senators and the white house? >> there does not appear to be anything new. the policy they are talking about are the same public -- policies that have been on the table for weeks. what is new is they seem to have finally agreed they will move forward with something. there is no guarantee that the republican leader and democratic leader will be able to put together an agreement. but they are now saying they will try to do it. they are working together and amy towards a vote sunday are monday. >> what is the scuttlebutt among the rank-and-file senators about whether or not they're going to be able to pull this off before the end of the weekend? >> it happened so late, and it w
not release him to pay off much in the last election? >> jason dick, emily goodin, thank you for being on "newsmakers." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> we will show our conversation with luke messer today again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. coast chambers of congress are in -- both chambers of congress are in. the senate is in at 1:00 eastern time. votes are scheduled at 2:00 p.m. eastern. majority leader harry reid and minority leader mcconnell had set a deadline of 3:00 p.m. when they're planning to convene a caucus meetings and update members of the parties on a possible plan for taxes and spending on the new year. will bring you live coverage of the senate on c-span2 started at 1:00 eastern. in the house, the return of 2:00 p.m. you'll be considering a number of pieces of legislation. what the live coverage of the house here and c-span. next, retiring senator kent conrad reflects on his career in congress to. it is currently senate budget committee chairman and was first elected to the senate in 1986. this
agree with you about the 2000 election. one of the things i talk about is the 2000 convention, democratic convention, i do if you remember that bill clinton came that bill clinton came down that long white corridor with a black suit, looked like high noon, gary cooper in high noon, remember? at the time of a city with george stephanopoulos watching this. i said george, i think -- out gorgeous game on. georgette the time said no, there's too much discord about president clinton still at this point. but i tended to agree with you. i think two things. number one, i think, this was a shortcoming and i think the media including us at abc news, i think the american people were ahead of us on the monica lewinsky story from the beginning to i think they figured out right quick that, in fact, he did it. they did not approve of it. they disapproved of it hardly but he was a really good president. thank you, thank you, what's going to do even when he left office his job approval ratings were quite high. the nation was doing quite well. on the other hand the clinton global initiative and
-term trajectory of growth. you know, we have been talking to the republicans ever since the election was over. they have had trouble saying yes to a number of repeated offers. yesterday i had another meeting with the leadership, and i suggested to them if they can't do a comprehensive package of smart deficit reduction, let's at minimum make sure that people's taxes don't go up and that 2 million people don't lose their unemployment insurance. and i was modestly optimistic yesterday. but we don't yet see an agreement, and now the pressure is on congress to produce. if they don't, what i've said is that in the senate, we should go ahead and introduce legislation that would make sure middle class taxes stay where they are, and there should be an up or down vote. everybody should have a right to vote on that. you know, if republicans don't like it, they can vote no. but i actually think that there's a majority of support for making sure that middle class families are held harmless. >> if you go over the cliff, what's the impact on the markets? they have been pretty confident up until now that a
taste it. as we saw as evidenced in the past election with more and more states, thank god, passing legislation about marriage equality. >> we have a coalition of people of faith who are actually trying to get both the republicans and the democrats to have a conversation on immigration. the president did promise that he wanted to address it. we're hoping that congress can work together and this year we can come to an agreement on a more comprehensive immigration reform package. >> if we can solve the problem of israel and make sure that israel has a proper, proper nation with safe borders and so on and yet at the same time allow the palestinians to have their own state. if we can solve that one than many of the world's problems in terms of interfaith dialogue will be resolved. >> it's very critical for america to have good reputation to have good liaison with the muslim world. >> we do hope that the president could maybe visit a mosque or attend an american muslim institution and really show that direct engagement, that hey, listen, you are part of the american framework and part of
'm for the going anywhere i loss an election, i didn't die. so i'm still going to be out there and this weekend, i went to a bet thing and so who knows what my next ventures will be and i still have my oslo and scandinavian -- a farmling community in the central valuegee and so i think i is it have -- so if you are thinking what am i doing going to loss oh, in the middle of winter., you know i saw a film and never scoped my interest in scandinavian culture and is that doesn't take away at all to my comment and being proud of being latin and sevenning the latin community this past year and so i'm grateful to my supporter and is grateful to the residents of district five and i love the city and happy to have had the opportunity to serve on this board. a. (applause). . >> thank you supervisor olague. our final accommodation of the day will be to our second colleague local be leaving us today although he know he is not going far sean i have to say when i read the resolution that was draft of the to you today i was honestly blown away by how much you have done over the whereas and supervisor elsb
within your personal career as pirptions when you could have done more much this elective life and i know malia brought up the love for your family but some. our legislative staff have been waiting with shots to get the festivity started and so thank you sean for your years of service. >>> thank you very much mr. president i'll try to keep it brief and needless to say, i don't believe that sean elsburnd was the first people to endorse he for supervisor but, one of the things that, became very clear to my when i first got elected and started talking to colleagues on the board of supervisors was how seriously sean else person takes this job and i don't know that i fully appreciated how challenging this job can be. it's a job that really dmadle the very best of all of us to do this right besides the legislative work, the work that happens in terms of you know serving addressing the nuts and bolts of what happens in a neighborhood, what was so incredible about coming on the board and talking to sean was just learning from him how he approached it up you know that the fact that he saw this
stories of 2012 and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the re-election of president barack obama, politics on the national level headed in a decidedly liberal direction. so what happened? and what does it mean for the country going forward? joining the panel this week, "wall streetf journal" columnist and political diary editor jason riley and washington columnist kim strossel. dan, we would like to say for a longtime we live in a center right country. if you l look at the last two presidential elections, that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living in a new progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i am not sure about the country. i think what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward and not to cut spending, but to increase spending. it is explicit from historic 20% of gdp to 25% of gdp. rather than cut spending, raise taxes as necessary to support the spending. and i would say that is in fact the french model. the question is whether that model can produce enough growth to supp
elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially rewrite legislation changing the plain text that congress passed in order to decla
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
, multimillionaires, billionaires. meanwhile, you have got the majority of the senators elected in this body saying we can do more at the top end. those of us who have a lot can get more revenue to address this crisis so you have got this stalemate that was created by two very different groups of people, all elected by the american people. >> now, walking out, i spoke to several of your colleagues, democratic senators who said they were not optimistic, really looking pretty glum. what camp are you in after what you just heard? do you think -- i mean, as you said, the clock is ticking, do you think by tonight or tomorrow, something will get passed to deal with at least the tax cuts that are going up by most americans? >> most successful businessmen and successful people i have talked to are willing to pay more and so it remains to be seen whether the republicans, being driven by a very extreme group of house members, will allow our economy to hurt because of their desire to protect multimillionaires in this country. i think that is what it is going to boil down to >> taxes are a big issue. the other is
to the republicans ever since the election was over. they have had trouble saying yes to a number of repeated offers. yesterday i had another meeting with the leadership and i suggested to them if they can't do a comprehensive package of smart deficit reduction, let's at minimum make sure that people's taxes don't go up. and that two million people don't lose their unemployment insurance. and i was modestly optimistic yesterday. but we don't yet see an agreement and now the pressure is on congress to produce. if they don't, what i've said is that in the senate, we should go ahead and introduce legislation that would make sure that middle classes taxes stay where they are and there should be an up or down vote. i think there's a majority support for making sure that the middle class families are held harmless. >> if you go over the cliff, what's the impact in the markets? which have been pretty confident until now that a deal would get done. >> it's hard to speculate on the markets. but obviously i think business and investors are going to feel more negative about the economy next year. if you look a
electe electeelected from swing districts, but it now there are only 35 such seats, and we have to make it through another eight years essentially of this partisanship. is that the problem? >> look at ohio, just for a minute. they had a race for congress there, like in every other state this fall, they voted about 52-47 republican-democrat for congress women and men. so you would think maybe a if i felt-50sto-up of congress, maybe 60-40. it's 12-3, republican-democrat, because of the way both sides-- >> o'donnell: gerrymandered district. >> and john boehner controls the ohio legislature. so they all kind of reap what they've sowed here. these are almost impossible-to-defeat congressmen in their districts. so some of that is gerrymandering. but i think another thing to remember here we've just been through this sort of six-week, eight-week drill on this fiscal cliff, and most of the conversation has been about taxes and the white house has done an excellent job, by dealing with the house, and all the messaging today and the weekend about how this is about republican intransigence on taxe
sticking to 250 campaigned on openly, overtly. he won the election on it overwhelmingly on that issue, 60% of the public was with him. so that is our position. it's a position that brings in more revenues and what we have learned at the fiscal situation deteriorated if you go much higher than 250 to raise the rest of the revenues you need you're going to hurt the middle class as you take away their tax deductions. >> but you said back then -- >> the right place to be. >> you said back then it would affect too many small businesses. frankly, sounds a little like senator kyl. >> the bottom line is very, very simple and that is that if you do -- if you go much above 250 you'll hurt the middle class even worse and small businesses even worse by having to take away tax deductions. that's not the place we were at two years ago. it is the place we're at now because the situation is deteriorating. >> it's exactly the opposite. the higher you set that level, the less small business you're going to hit and you're exactly right and chuck was right back when he talked about a million because the incr
control the u.s. senate. hundreds of thousands of voters turned out in northern virginia on election day, and some waited in long lines for four hours to cast their votes, and presidential candidates rallied supporters throughout the campaign and spending millions on ads. in the end, the voters helped to re-elect barack obama and elected tim kaine to the senate. and then marriage equality was approved, and gay coupled in maryland can begin saying "i do" in january. number three, scandal in the district. two sitting counsel members resigned and were charged with felonies. harry thomas resigned in january admitting to stealing $400,000 that was designated for city youth programs. plus, the on going investigation into d.c. mayor vincent gray's 2010 campaign. harris pleaded guilty to a $650,000 shadow campaign to help elect gray. two other campaign workers pleaded guilty to a separate scheme to pay minor candidate brown for his sharp criticism of mayor fenty. and then the d.c. baseball team made playoffs. the washington nationals earned the best record in baseball on the way to clinching the
for the senate? he said i want to show the world that a well run machine can take an office boy in the election to the senate and truman in's first term there is considered a senator from prendergast. even in his second term he develops more of a national reputation but he is not expert on any of these issues. so he gets in there and write from the beginning every meeting he has with people he says this is a terrible mistake. i'm not take enough and i'm not smart enough and april 13, his first day in office mates meets with the reporters at the capitol. he said voice if you pray for me now, i don't know a few ever had a load of hay fall on you but i feel the moon and stars and all the planets have fallen on me. good luck mr. president. truman says i wish you didn't have to come me that. host go. >> host: back to henry wallace is perhaps the unsung hero of your book and i know as oliver was saying thinking about working on a screenplay a while back about while this. this is one of the great counterfactual's of modern american history. what if wallace had gotten nominated in 1944? in your book, h
? >> the way democrats feel is this president campaigned and won an election on $250,000. additionally the polls reflect there is solid support for that. certainly 60% of americans believe that. now, having said, that elections matter. so we believe that the 250,000 threshold is the appropriate threshold. the president did make an offer we understand of 400,000 with a trillion in cuts accompanying it. that was turned down by the house. the time has come really to measure the absence of a deal plus against a deal and i think both of us come down that we have to solve this immediate situation. the danger to our people, to our military, to our nation's security, to our economic base is just too great not to have a solution. so you know, what makes this government work is compromise and it is when you don't compromise there is stasis. we had enough of that for too long. >> chris: 400,000 you could live with. not happily but you could live with. >> could i ask a question i will get asked. where does the money go. let's say it is 400,000. >> chris: which is roughly $600 billion. >> if i'm a
of the lgbt community? have you seen that trend and what was the turning point? >> elections have consequences. i'm going to quote a paraphrase, former chairman of the rnc, haley barbour said, purity is the enemy of victory. and what he was getting at is something we have been saying for quite a while. let's win on the corollaries that we agree upon. we agree upon economic freedom, we agree upon strong national security. we agree upon the core conservative tenets of individual liberty and individual responsibility. let's not isolate or separate fellow americans because of something like their sexual orientation. >> let me ask you this, then -- >> yeah. >> why not do the right thing? when does winning an election supersede doing the right thing? why didn't doing the right thing have more importance than winning elections? >> it's principle and pragmatism. it's a combination of the two. let's start with principle. the first three republicans on the r.m.a., the respect for marriage act. the chairman was the first, the three members gave their word to log cabin republicans to be co-sponsors. long
were right after the presidential election, everybody was bored. and this happened during newtown or during the presidential campaign. it would not have been as big a deal. this was a timing issue. >> nothing else going on, remember how, you know, the stakeouts in front of jill kelley's house. >> how do they send 30,000 to 40,000 e-mails. just this nonstop, salacious story. >> yes, but it was great television. sex and espionage and spies. i mean, this was the kardashian of national security. >> that's not a good thing, pal. >> wrong metric. that was the kardashian impression in the worst way. it was to try to get eyeballs and sensationalize the story and good tv and good entertainment is not the same as good information. this was not a high-point political coverage. this was inhead of the cia and the fallout, the next man the supreme ally and this is a big story. >> let's have a little perspective. nobody is saying because david petraeus had to resign as head of the cia and general john allen was dragged into it and interesting story on every human level. no one is saying it wasn'
is this president campaigned and won an election on $250,000. additionally the polls reflect there is solid support for that. certainly 60% of americans believe that. now, having said that, elections matter. so, we believe that the 250,000 threshold is the appropriate threshold. the president did make an offer, we understand, of $400,000. with a trillion in cuts. accompanying it. that was turned down by the house. the time has come, really, to measure the absence of a deal plus -- against a deal. and i think both of us come down that we have to solve this immediate situation. the danger to our people, to our military, to our nation's security, to our economic base is just too great not to have a solution. so, you know, what makes this government work, is compromise, and, it is when you don't compromise, there is stasis -- >> you say 400,000 you could live with, not happily -- >> isn't that the question i will get asked? where does the money go? let's say it is $400,000. people vote $400,000, pay 39.3. >> chris: which is roughly $600 billion. >> if i'm asked at home, senator graham, what will we do
executive's officer's report. >> miss miller. >> we have election of officers in january -- i really don't have a report unless you want to talk about the joint hearing that we had with the sf puc. we are looking for dates in february for the next one but other than that that concludes my reports. >> commissioners, any comments or questions? >> any member of the public what would like to speak? seeing none public comment is closed and i'm not sure when to make this throat, but as i. >> >> understand it this is our last lafco meeting of calendar year and because of that it probably is the last meeting that we will have commissioner olague sitting in as a member of lafco for at least for the time being, and so i just -- on a very personal note i want to take this opportunity to thank commissioner olague for her service on the local agency formation commission. it really has been an honor and you have provided a tremendous contribution. i think it's definitely the case that community choice aggregation would not be where it is today without your support and involvement, and it's really -
. >>> supervisor kim. >> speaking as another female elected i have always appreciated that you have mentoring those of us who are entering into the field after you and not a lot of elected officials do that to give their advise and support and i appreciate the support that you have given to me and i also want to say that i have an incredible apt of respect fortitude you have and the honesty and the way you carry yourself as-woman and a woman leader and it's rare to see that type of leadership and those of us in this field admire those qualities about and you see how incredible you have moving through a lot of different types of politics and fundraisings and lots of other things and so i want to thank you again for being that role-model and i appreciate what you have done. >> supervisor kim, i also want to add a few words for myself. fee i don't evenna you [spelling?] you main annoy you are the first asian america supervisor that i got know when i was a community activist and i appreciate your words of wisdom done and encouragement for all of the work that we do here and i also want to take
election, barack obama being re-elected not withstanding some significant economic concerns going into the beginning of 2012, or a year ago at the end of 2011, it was clear the president would have an uphill battle. and three things struck me as interesting. super packs, the billions raised to reshape voter thinking, and particularly senate and house races, you saw a real impact -- >> in our region. >> absolutely in our region. and that was the first thing that struck me, and the second was turnout. i was among those that believed the president would get 95 or 96% of the african-american vote, and it turned out to be the same. and the same with young voters. and nobody expected the turnout to be the same with young voters. so turnout was a big point in that regard. and lastly, the romney campaign, which was supposed to revolutionize the way politics were done, and the enormous amount of money he was able to raise and he was running for president for all intents and purposes for five years, and on election night it was one tremendous letdown for the governor and all of his supporte
morning, d.c. dark there now, but waky, waky our elected leaders. you have only two days ahead of you before that fiscal cliff deadline. hope you're well rested and fed and dugout from the snow storm yesterday because the clock is ticking down on 2012 and to that deline for avoiding the fiscal cliff, but after weeks of negotiations, patience is running short. here's president obama after his meeting with top political leaders on friday. >> the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is in this town for some reason you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait until last minute. well, we're now at the last minute. the american people are not going to have any patience for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. >> and he apparently wasn't kidding. we put out a call for our cnn ireporters to send us their messages to washington and, yes, we got a ton of responses. quite a few of you were frustrate would the lack of action in washingto
until later in the year. and so they not only falsified the elections that followed, preceded independence. they falsified even consensus. now, if you check the annals of home office, so-called home office, which is where the colonies are ministered, look for the book of harold smith was one of the civil service in nigeria at the time. he was in the white house and he got into trouble because he not will -- he did not want to carry out those orders. but falsification of the first elections. .. which is staged -- that is southern southerners from the eastern part. through three peso, a countercoup and then that eventually to the secession of the eastern part because they were the largest terms. there were singled out for having initiative and for the guilty of killing some of the northern leaders. there's no disputing that fact. and so is restored to the countercoup at the north we suffered in nigeria at a home many decades of military rule. from the very kindly as we see nigeria to to the service of a theatre world. the next resident in nigeria was a military man he been presi
and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and hopefully we'll have garnered some support and move forward, so we'll keep sounding that drum beat but tlt be on pause until after january when the new add m*ins -- administrations get all in place, so the problem, this can be really overwhelming, especially if you have not spent a lot of time thinking about this, but i think one of the solutions is just to start with one thing at a time and pick something that resonates for you, whether it's your food or you have kids and you just want to focus on making sure that -- what they're using and taking in is safer, or if it's an area of your life with regard -- we'll talk about this somehow with the fire department or your fire stations or your fire houses or whatever, also reach out to the breast cancer funds, we love q
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